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Pool Pump Motor Answer Guide

In a earlier blog, we  compiled a feed of previous blogs that all dealt with pool pumps. Our idea was to create a one stop shop for pool pump questions. This would eliminate the need for customers to browse through our blogs, how to guides, and poolside chat videos for general answers to one specific topic. As a result, we have decided to do the same with pool pump motors.

The motor is the only electrical component on your pump and therefore is the part that is replaced (and neglected) the most. For this reason, we receive many questions and concerns about pump motors, how they operate, and how to diagnose the issue. In this blog you will find answers to questions ranging from the most popular to the most obscure. In fact, we recommend you save this blog as a favorite because we can guarantee you will have to replace your motor at some point. Let’s explore. 

 

How To Read Pump Motor Labels 

To a layperson (and some pool techs) reading a motor label is a sketchy task. As we scour the fading label that contains a jumble of numbers and abbreviations, our brows will furrow in confusion. If this is you, it is ok because you are in the majority rather than the minority. Most with general knowledge can understand horsepower (HP), amps and volts but the rest will look completely foreign.

Click here for our how to guide and video on how to read a pump motor label. 

 

109_frameWhat Does my Pump Motor Frame Mean?

Your pump motor’s frame (FR) rating notes three key parts of your motor’s design which will help you match your current motor to a replacement. The three key parts are:

  • Barrel Size
  • Flange Shape
  • Shaft-End Type

As we know from previous blogs and how-to guides, the quickest and easiest way to find your pump’s motor replacement is to input the motor’s , (CAT) or number into Inyo’s search feature. However, over time pump motor labels fade, tear or smudge making the part or catalog number unreadable. Knowing your motor’s frame rating, in conjunction with its horsepower, service factor and amps, will help you find a match.

 

Why Is My Motor Running Hot?

If your motor is hot to the touch it may raise the thermometer’s mercury as well as red flags. The excessive heat produced by your motor is a sign of inefficiency and symptomatic of motor damage. In this blog post we will walk through common signs, causes and fixes to an overheating motor.

Click here to see our how to guide on troubleshoot a pool pump motor that is overheating. 

 

blogE16Video: Poolside Chat Episode 16- Pump Motor Making a Clicking Sound

This is Poolside Chat where every week we answer your questions on how to fix and maintain your swimming pool. Poolside Chat is presented by INYOPools.com, helping pool owners find the right parts since 2001. In today’s episode of Poolside Chat, Rob and Matt tackle another common swimming pool question: Why is my pool pump motor making a clicking sound?

 

Pool Motor Troubleshooting  Pool Motor Troubleshooting

It is that time of year when the pesky pool problems start to hit your filtering system: low pressure,hot motor, or a potentially dead motor. I know this because I have taken your phone calls, picking my brain on what to do next. Chances are, I referred you to one of our handy dandy How To Guides on the subject. We have covered so many topics that some of the important topics get lost in the shuffle, so let’s bring them to light.

 

Think You’re Cut Out To Replace Your Pool Pump Motor? Take This Quiz

If your pump motor is on its last legs you may be pondering doing the repairs yourself. Do you think you’re up for the challenge? Take our test and find out…

 

 

Does it make sense to repair my pool motor?Does It Make Sense To Repair My Pool Pump Motor?

When it comes to a failed pool pump motor, the pool owner is faced with with that eternal question, “repair or replace?” The first thing to check is if it’s still under warranty. For a pump that still has the original motor, you would contact the manufacturer of the entire pump. If you have already replaced the motor before, you would contact the manufacturer of the motor. As most pump and motor warranties are only 1 year, you might be out of luck but it’s worth double checking the purchase date.

Click here to see a video on how to replace the motor on your pool pump

 

7  Biggest Mistakes When Replacing A Pool Motor

I talk to thousands of customers each year about replacing their pool pump motors and the vast majority of our customers install the motors themselves without a hitch. However, occasionally we do encounter mistakes which are made when replacing your motor. So I decided to poll my fellow co-workers, manufacturers and vendors to come up with a list of the seven most common mistakes when replacing a pool motor. The results are in… Drum roll please…

Click here to review our how to guide on how to choose the right replacement pool pump motor. 

 

Is a 1.0 HP Motor The Same As A 1.5 HP Motor?

If you are one of the lucky ones who can still read your motor label, you’re already one step ahead of the game. Searching for your replacement pool motor can seem rather daunting at first. Take your model number, type it into the search field on our site, and VOILA your motor pops up. However, after clicking on the motor you notice one major difference – the horsepower. You are absolutely certain the motor in your hand has a 1.5 horsepower motor, but the one listed on the website is a 1.0 horsepower. Thinking you must have typed in the wrong number, you re-enter the model number again. Same result.

So, is the 1.0 horsepower the same as a 1.5 horsepower?

Maybe.

3 thoughts on “Pool Pump Motor Answer Guide

  1. I replaced my swimming pool motor with exact identical new motor.
    I replaced the shaft seal as well. I made the electric connection same as the photograph I took before removing the old electrical connection. Now when I switched the power on, nothing except some hum.
    What did I do wrong ?

  2. Hi,
    I
    My M.I.L. has a US Motors EUSQ1152 motor that needs to be replaced. After removing the 4 lugs in the base plate, the motor won’t slide off the pump housing. It wiggles quite a bit, but won’t come out even after a fair bit of jkstling,/pulling. It seems as if something further in is flared out and causing the obstruction. I have no idea what it is though…Is there any chance the impeller broke off and is wedged in the pump housing in a way that prevents the motor from sliding out? Any ideas would be appreciated!
    Thanks!
    -Chan

    1. Hello Chan, it would help if you could add pictures, but I know that is a problem with our forum, so you may try asking this question on Inyo’s Forum. But I will give a shot at answering this question.

      The four bolts you removed that connect the motor to the seal plate are just one step of removing the motor. The impeller is screwed onto the end of the motor shaft, sandwiching the seal plate, and motor mount onto the motor. You will need to remove the screws mounting the seal plate to the pump housing, and then remove the impeller before the motor can be completely removed.

      Try reading this how-to guide for steps: How To Replace the Motor on Your Pool Pump

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