How To Install an Intermatic T104 Timer

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Running pool equipment 24 hours is usually unnecessary and expensive. Installing an Intermatic T104 timer is a great way to dramatically reduce run time and energy costs. The following steps will provide a guide on how to install the T104 timer. Note, timers vary with supply voltage. A T104 timer is used for 230V supply voltage. If you are using 115V supply voltage, you will need a T101 timer. The installation steps are the same for either.

Step by Step

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Step 1

Open up the T104 box and remove the black plastic insulator. The insulator is held in place by one screw.

Step 2

Locate an area on the wall near the pool equipment for the timer box. Locate the timer out of reach of the sprinklers or drainage spouts.

Step 3

Mark the locations for the three mounting screws. One is located on top of the timer box and two are located inside the timer box towards the bottom.

Step 4

Drill three holes where the mounting screws will be installed. Note: We used a special 3/16" carbide drill bit to drill into the concrete.

Step 5

Install screws (or other hardware appropriate for the mounting surface) through the mounting holes of the Intermatic T104 timer box. Note: We used 1/4" x 1-1/4" hex head concrete anchors. Hex head anchors are recommended for better traction when installing into concrete.

Step 6

Remove two of the knockouts from the timer box. One knockout will lead to the breaker panel and the other will lead to the pool equipment.

Step 7

Thread a 1/2" mpt terminal adapter into the knockouts on the timer box.

Step 8

Your next step is to wire the power from the breaker panel to the pool timer. When wiring, be sure to follow local and NEC/CEC electrical codes. CONTACT A PROFESSIONAL ELECTRICTIAN IF YOU ARE UNCOMFORTABLE WORKING WITH POWER. Incorrect wiring can cause dangerous shocks and may void your warranty.

Step 9

TURN OFF THE POWER AT THE BREAKER PANEL.

Step 10

Measure the distance from the breaker panel to the timer box. Cut a piece of 1/2" electrical conduit to match this distance.

Step 11

Feed the three cables from the breaker panel through the conduit and into the Intermatic timer box.

Step 12

Press the conduit into the terminal adapter.

Step 13

Connect the ground wire to the green screw located on the Intermatic timer mechanism. The ground wire will be green or exposed copper.

Step 14

Locate the two input power cables that come from the breaker. Connect one to terminal 1 and the other to terminal 3. Terminals 1 and 3 are called the "Lines". Note: it does not matter what color goes to 1 or 3. It only matters that one cable is on 1 and the other is on 3.

Step 15

The next steps will involve connecting the equipment to the timer.

Step 16

Measure the distance from the equipment to the timer box. Cut a piece of 1/2" electrical conduit to match this distance.

Step 17

Feed the three cables from the equipment through the conduit and into the Intermatic timer box.

Step 18

Press the conduit into the terminal adapter.

Step 19

Connect the ground wire to the green screw located on the Intermatic timer mechanism. The ground wire will be green or exposed copper.

Step 20

Connect the cables running from the equipment to terminals 2 and 4. One cable will go to teminal 2 and the other to terminal 4. Terminals 2 and 4 are called the "Loads". The Loads are what the timer controls. Note: it does not matter what color goes to 2 or 4.

Step 21

Place the black plastic insulator back into the box and tighten the screw to keep it in place.

Step 22

The next steps will involve programming the timer.

Step 23

There is a silver Time Pointer on the Clock-Dial. This Time Pointer will point directly to the current time.

Step 24

To set the time, pull the Intermatic Clock-Dial outward. Turn the dial in either direction and align the exact time of day on the Clock-Dial to the Time Pointer. The picture displays the timer set to 12:00 pm.

Step 25

The next steps will demonstrate how to set the trippers. The trippers will determine when the equipment will turn on and off.

Step 26

Locate the "On" tripper. The "On" tripper is typically green and will be labeled "On".

Step 27

To set the "On" tripper, hold the tripper against the desired time and tighten the tripper screw firmly. The picture displays the "On" tripper set at 8:00 am.

Step 28

Locate the "Off" tripper. The "Off" tripper is typically gold and will be labeled "Off".

Step 29

To set the "Off" tripper, hold the tripper against the desired time and tighten the tripper screw firmly. The picture displays the "Off" tripper set at 4:00 pm.

Step 30

Turn on the the power at the breaker panel.

Step 31

The Intermatic T104 Series Timer should now be successfully installed. The yellow clock dial should be spinning and the equipment should turn on and off at the set time. Close the timer door and enjoy the energy savings with using a timer.

Comments

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(81 to 93 of 93)

 Posted: 8/5/2014 

I just installed a new intermatic T104M for my swimming pool pump and salt water system. It ran fine for two days and now it has begun to run for a few seconds and turn off. The wires from the breaker are hooked up to post 1 & 3 and the wires to the pump and system are hooked up at 2 & 4. Any pointers as to why it keeps shutting off is appreciated. Thanks
 Reply

InyoPools Product Specialist  Posted: 6/18/2014 

T104 timer - A T104 timer can handle 40 amps. Customers generally run a pump and salt system on one timer. Check you tatal amperage, but I think adding the heater would exceed 40 amps. Most heater are set up to shut off when the minimum flow required drops below 40 GPM or so, so they would shut off them self when the pump is turned off.
 Reply

Anonymous  Posted: 6/17/2014 

Can this timer handle more than two loads? What I mean is, can I connect pool pump, heather and salt system to it ?
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InyoPools Product Specialist  Posted: 5/31/2014 

Pat - Looking at step 14, since this is a 220V timer, all lines you see are hot. There is no neutral. The white lines on terminals 1 and 3 go to the back of the timer to power the clock motor. The red and black lines on terminals 1 and 3 are the supply lines coming from your breaker box. Both are hot for 220V. See our guide on "How To Replace an Intermatic T104 Clock Motor" for a different look at this.
 Reply

 Posted: 5/30/2014 

What about the timer wires ? The two white wires ,are they both hot? Or one neutral one hot when hooking up 220v I have one to the neutral one hot and the timer is not working I noticed in the picture they both seam to be going to terminals 1-3?
 Reply

InyoPools Product Specialist  Posted: 5/28/2014 

Larry - I would measure the voltage coming into the current timer. Here's our guide on measuring voltage: How To Use a Multimeter to Test a Pool Pump Motor - Voltage.
 Reply

 Posted: 5/27/2014 

My old timer has the paper inside the door torn off. How do I tell which model I need? The breaker in the main panel is a double labeled 10 amp, 120 - 240. Since it is a double breaker does this mean it is a 240?
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InyoPools Product Specialist  Posted: 5/25/2014 

Joe - You have the right timer. T104 is the most common timer used to control pool pumps. T104R3 is the metal version for 220V. T104P3 is the plastic version. Both are commonly used outdoors in the weather. They have a rubber seal on the door. Lighting control is one option. And I don't know why they said "For indoor Installation" except to indicate that it could be installed indoors also. Check to make sure it has the rubber seal.
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 Posted: 5/25/2014 

Our General Contractor (Plumbing and Electrical) recently installed (Friday, 23 May, 2014) our new Hayward 1HP Super Pump (a replacement)and also an Intermatic 24h Mechanical Time Switch (Model T104) since we wanted to try running our pump system on an 8-10h cycle to lower the cost of operation this Summer. I wanted to install an Intermatic Model with the plastic enclosure since our electrical system is located outside in the elements. The only Intermatic Timer he could find in town was Model # T104 (208-277 VAC-60HZ / DPST) and it is in a metal enclosure. Later, after the new pump and timer was installed, I noticed that the front of the box (lower left corner) stated the following: "Great for Controlling Incandescent, Fluorescent, LED, and CFL lighting". Also, "For Indoor Installation".

Unfortunately I cannot contact our contractor since he is away for Holiday weekend and will not return until Monday evening. Our pool is scheduled to be open on Wednesday, 28 May (only 3 days away) and my wife and I are concerned about whether this was the correct timer to install.

ANY QUICK INFORMATION YOU COULD GIVE US WOULD BE GREATLY APPRECIATED. I WOULD LIKE TO BE ABLE TO TALK WITH OUR CONTRACTER UPON HIS RETURN TO TOWN IF THIS WAS NOT THE CORRECT TIMER TO USE. We have very little time before the pool people show-up to open the pool and crank-up the new Hayward pump motor.

Thank You .... I surely hope we hear back from you ASAP. You have been a great help in other questions we had about installing a timer and how it would NOT hurt our new motor pump.

Joe

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 Posted: 11/7/2013 

Simple and direct. That is exactly what I needed!
 Reply

Anonymous  Posted: 9/14/2013 


After wiring this timer up to my pool pump. Hit the breaker clintching my teen in antisipation of having to change the fuse! The diagram on the timer was not simple enough.
THANKS for this IDIOT PROOF demonstration. "The Check is in the mail"...
George

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InyoPools Product Specialist  Posted: 9/13/2013 

timers - The white and black wiring is generally the convention for 110V systems. Timers are sold for 110V systems (T101) and 220V systems (T104). Make sure you have the correct timer for your pool system.
 Reply

Anonymous  Posted: 9/12/2013 

my old timer the timer motor leads connected to one black the other to white why new one in store both to black k



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