How To Calculate the Cost of Running A Pool Pump

WRITTEN BY:  Rob

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One of the most powerful consumers of energy in homes with swimming pools are pool pumps. With the rising electric costs, it is important to understand how much it costs to run a pool pump. The following guide will explain how to easily calculate the cost of running a pool pump.

Step by Step

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Step 1

Locate the voltage and amperage rating of the pump. The specifications should be listed on the motor label. In our example we used a 1.5HP Hayward Super Pump. The voltage rating is 115/230 and the amp rating is 18.6/9.3. If you run a pump on the lower voltage rating (115) you will select the higher amperage rating (18.6). If you run the pump on the higher voltage (230) you will select the lower amperage rating (9.3). For this example we will use the 230 voltage and 9.3 amperage rating.

Step 2

Multiply the voltage rating by the amperage rating. This will give the total watts. Example: 230 volt X 9.3 amps = 2,139 watts

Step 3

Divide the total watts by 1,000 to get kilowatts (kW). Example: 2,139 watts / 1,000 = 2.139 kW

Step 4

Multiply the hours per day you run the pool pump by the kW. This total will be the kWh per day. Example: 8 hours/day X 2.139 kW = 17.112 kWh per day.

Step 5

Multiply the kWh per day by the cost per kWh. The cost per kWh can be found on your most recent power bill. The result will tell you how much it costs to run your pump each day. Example: 17.112 kWh a day x .12 cents per kWh = $2.05 per day to operate the pool pump

Comments

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(1 to 10 of 10)

Inyopools  Posted: 11/12/2017 14:25 PM  Inyo Product Specialist

Bob - It costs considerably more to run your pump at high speed than low speed. It uses more amps.


Bob  Posted: 11/07/2017 12:07 PM 

Does it cost more to run the pump at high speed or low speed?


Juliie  Posted: 11/01/2017 22:36 PM 

Hi, just wondering if you followed up on the comment regarding hp, and which calculation is correct? Thanks


Inyopools  Posted: 07/31/2017 15:45 PM  Inyo Product Specialist

Anonymous (power calc) - Thank you for your feedback. I will look into this.


Anonymous  Posted: 07/30/2017 19:45 PM 

There is a problem with this calculation. The amps drawn include reactive power. There are two components to power active power measured in watts and reactive power measured in volt amps. Consumers are only billed for active power, watts. Unslee you know the power angle you can't calculate the amount of active power from the information given. However, if you know the hp rating of the motor you can simply multiply that by 746, which will convert hp to watts. Then dived by 1000 to get kW and then figure out cost as per the instructions.


Inyopools  Posted: 06/20/2017 12:15 PM  Inyo Product Specialist

Anonymous (pool cost) - I don't know your numbers, but unless you have a much bigger pump, it sounds like you may be off by a factor of ten. Did you multiply the KWh per day by the cost of a KWh is step 5?


Anonymous  Posted: 06/20/2017 9:08 AM 

If I'm doing this correctly it tells me it's $20 a day to run my pool for 8 hours!!! That means my electric bill would be $699 a month just for the pool. Is that accurate ?


Inyopools  Posted: 09/10/2015 18:13 PM  Inyo Product Specialist

NeilBJ- Thank you for your comment. You are correct. To get our units in order, I changed Step #3 to read, "Divide the total watts by 1,000 to get kilowatts (kW). Example: 2,139 watts / 1,000 = 2.139 kW; and Step #4 now reads, "Multiply the hours per day you run the pool pump by the kW. This total will be the kWh per day. Example: 8 hours/day X 2.139 kW = 17.112 kWh per day.


NeilBJ  Posted: 09/08/2015 19:56 PM 

Re: Step 3
Step 3
Divide the total watts by 1,000. The result of this will provide a kilowatt hour rating (kWh). Example: 2,139 watts / 1,000 = 2.139 kWh.

This calculation merely converts watts to kilowatts. The answer should be 2.139 kilowatts.

Step 4 is the calculation for kilowatt hours:

8 hours X 2.139 kilowatts = 17.112 kilowatt-hours

Your calculation results in 12.112 kilowatt–hours exp 2
One thing I learned in college is to make sure the units are consistent


SARVESH M KOLUMBKAR  Posted: 01/29/2015 6:20 AM 

Brilliant !!!