How To Understand Pool Light Options

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There are many brands and types of pool lights on the market today. This guide discusses the different options available in wall mounted pool lights. Other pool light options for perimeter or feature lighting are discussed in another guide.

Step by Step

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Step 1

LIGHT TYPES - Pool lights come in three types: INCANDESCENT, HALEGON, and LED. The older style INCANDESCENT lights have light bulbs much like the standard bulbs used in your house before we went the newer more cost efficient CFL (Compact Fluorescent Light) bulbs. They only provided white light. HALEGON lights came next. They were much more compact and operated with less power but they also were limited to producing white light.  Some halogen lights did produce limited color with a mechanical rotating disc in front of the white light. The newest light is the LED type. LED lights have several benefits. They are significantly cheaper to run and they not only produced color light, but they give you the option of generating up to 5 distinct color in up to 7 different predefined programs. LED lights are also available in white only for commercial pools that require white light by code.

Step 2

VOLTAGE 12V vs 120V - Pool lights are designed to operate with 12V or 120V. In some areas of the country the local code requires a low voltage 12V light while in other areas it is fine to use a 120V light. Before installing a light, find out what your local code require. If you install a 12V light you will need to install a transformer to convert the 120V house voltage to 12V. If you are replacing an existing light and do not know your voltage you may try the following techniques to find this information: 1.) Look on the face of the light bulb for the voltage rating. 2.) Look to see if you have a transformer wired before the light. If you have transformer then you have a 12V light. 3.) Check the back of the light housing where the cord connects into the light, there will be a label specification of your light. The brightness of a 12V and 120V will be the same. Some manufactures do not recommend using a 12V light if the cord of the light is going to be longer than 100' feet because you may have a voltage drop. Note: Brightness, discussed more below, is a function of light wattage not voltage. The brightness of a 12V or a 120V light will be the same.

Step 3

POWER – Power is measured by watts. The higher the wattage, the higher the cost to run a light. Incandescent lights generally run from 100W to 500W; LED lights from 30W to 90W. LED lights as much more efficient. For a rough comparison a 45W LED light will generate as much light as a 300W incandescent light – an 85% reduction in operating costs. This will vary by manufacturer, but the newer LED light designs are continually increasing light efficiency

Step 4

BRIGHTNESS – The brightness of a 12V and 120V is the same. Brightness is generally measured by lumens but you won’t see that number published consistently. For incandescent lights, the higher the wattage the brighter the light. LED brightness is more vague. You may have to dig into the descriptions to get a brightness comparison to incandescent light. In general the newer LED technologies will be brighter for a given wattage.

Step 5

FACE RING – Most lights have two options for the Face Ring around the face of the light: STAINLESS STEEL (SS) and PLASTIC. Most Plastic Face Rings are white but they can be offered in gray and black.

Step 6

LIGHT BULB BASES - The base of the light bulbs in the incandescent and halogen lights come in several different styles and sizes. Different styles include screw in, bayonet, and wedge. This is important when you are trying to replace an existing light bulb with a new one or when replacing an old incandescent bulb with a LED light bulb. If an Incandescent bulb has as standard Edison base, it can only be replaced with an Edison based LED Bulb.

Step 7

CORD LENGTH – Lights come permanently attached to the power cord. They come in several cord length from 15’ to 150’ with 30’, 50’, 100, and 150’ being the most common. When you buy a light, you have to buy one that will reach from the pool to the power source plus 10 feet. You cannot slice into this cord to make it longer.

Step 8

NICHE COMPATIBILITY – Generally when a pool is built, the contractor installs permanent fixtures into the side of the pool wall to hold the light fixture. The most common niches are made by Hayward, Pentair and Sta-Rite. Some lights are compatible with any of these niches, but that is generally not the case. See our guide on "How To Select a LED Color Changing Light to Replace an Old White Light" for more information.

Step 9

BULB REPLACEMENT – Most of the incandescent and halogen light failures can be fixed by replacing the light fixture’s bulb.   If you want to replace an incandescent light bulb with a color changing light bulb, see our guide on "How To Convert to a LED Color Changing Light by Changing the Light Bulb”. Only a few incandescent light fixtures can be converted with a bulb change. The rest will require a complete light fixture change. There is no bulb color light conversion for halogen lights.

Step 10

CONTROL – Most lights can be turned on and off at a wall switch or incorporated into a control box to be turned on and off automatically. The newer LED color changing lights have several options for color and light programs. If you don’t have the lights linked to a control box, these options can be selected by switching the wall switch on and off until you reach the color or program you desire. To sync multiple LED lights to be controlled together, you would tie them to one switch through a common junction box. One or two LED lights like Pentair’s Intellibrite or Intellibrite 5g light have an optional remote controller to select the color/programs more conveniently.

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(1 to 32 of 32)

 Posted: 5/22/2019 

Looking to replace my entire light fixture (s). Not sure if they run wires independently or spliced together behind the scenes. What is the most common? In looking in the back of the niche, it looks to have “rubber cement” looking stuff to seal around the cord. Is cutting it out going to cause any issues? Last question, can I buy a regular light fixture and just replace the light bulb with a LED light bulb for cost savings verses buying an LED light fixture?
 Reply

InyoPools Product Specialist  Posted: 5/22/2019 

The light cables should not be spliced together. It should be one continuous line from the light to the junction box. The most common way to plug the niche is a cord stopper or a 2-part underwater epoxy. Yes, you can buy a standard light fixture and add an LED bulb. We do this with our PureLine PureColors light.
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Anonymous  Posted: 5/22/2019 

If I pull out the wire that’s has the apoxy in the back, my assumption is water will get into the conduit. Is that a bad thing or do I need to drain the pool below the light fixtures? Thank you
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InyoPools Product Specialist  Posted: 5/22/2019 

You do not need to drain the water down below the niche. It's ok if water gets into the conduit because the end of the cable will terminate at the junction box above the water level. 
 Reply

 Posted: 5/17/2019 

I bought a 120v light kit but just figured out I HAD a 12v kit. Can I just by pass the converter and wire the line directly to my power supply? What are my options? Please
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InyoPools Product Specialist  Posted: 5/17/2019 

Assuming your local codes don't require a 12v light, you could bypass the transformer and wire the 120v light to the breaker.
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 Posted: 5/3/2019 

I just had to replace my pool light for the first time. It had a 120V // 500W incandescent bulb in it. The pool company have me a 400W bulb and I didn't notice it until I got home. Should I be concerned with having a 400W vs a 500W bulb? Will I notice a difference in the light output? And if I wanted to just go with an LED bulb, is it as simple as just buying on from the pool store and screwing into the receptacle? Any assistance would be greatly appreciated.
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InyoPools Product Specialist  Posted: 5/6/2019 

Hello Mike - The 400w bulb won't be as bright as your old 500w light bulb. We carry a variety of LED bulbs that can screw into most pool light fixtures. They won't be as bright as a 400w or 500w incandescent bulb.
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 Posted: 4/30/2019 

Just installed a Pentair 5G Intellibrite LED pool light to a regular switch. However it is not changing colors as it should be when switching on and off several times. Do I need to add a transformer so those lights will work ? If so which one? Thank You
 Reply

InyoPools Product Specialist  Posted: 4/30/2019 

Hello Rob - You'd only need to add a transformer if you installed 12v pool lights.
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 Posted: 4/29/2019 

Can a pool light be 24V? My electrician tested the transformer going to the pool and he said it was 24V going to the light.
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InyoPools Product Specialist  Posted: 4/29/2019 

Can you provide the light model information to verify the type of voltage it requires?
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 Posted: 4/20/2019 

I have some Pentair SAM lights and wanted to upgrade to LED's, either with Pentair or Hayward. Both would fit in my niche. But after reading the many bad reviews on both brands, I am at a loss as to what to mfg to choose. Any recommendations or suggestions?
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InyoPools Product Specialist  Posted: 4/24/2019 

Hello Ray - If i had to choose between the two, Pentair would be my pick. We have heard of more issues surrounding the ColorLogic than any other LED pool light. If you are open to any other options of LED lights, have a look at the Pureline PureColors. The PureColors features similar brightness, light shows, use the same niche, and bulb hour ratings; but these bulbs are replaceable. So, in the unfortunate occasion that a light goes out, the bulb can be screwed out and a new one screwed in, without having to install a whole new light fixture.
 Reply

 Posted: 4/18/2019 

I'm getting a pool installed this month. They asked me if I wanted to upgrade to a led light which is $900. The regular light is 500w Hayward. I want a light that changes colors. Cant I just purchase a Led bulb that changes colors or do I need to spend $900 for the upgrade?
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InyoPools Product Specialist  Posted: 4/19/2019 

Hello Ricardo - In most Hayward light fixtures the incandescent bulb can be replaced with an LED bulb. The 120V LED bulb option is part number PL5809. The only Hayward light it doesn't work in is the SP0540 series.
 Reply

 Posted: 4/3/2019 

I currently have an old fiber optic light system on my pool that hasn't worked for 2 years. Plan to replace this with a new led system but have no idea where to begin. I am handy enough to do this on my own but I have no idea where to begin. Help and suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
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InyoPools Product Specialist  Posted: 4/8/2019 

Hello Shawn - if you plan to replace your fiberoptic pool illuminator with LED, we suggest the ION-8000 Fiber Optic Illuminator. The installation is relatively easy if you are handy.
 Reply

Anonymous  Posted: 5/6/2019 

You may also wish to easily upgrade your fiber optic spotlight with the SR Smith PT6000 - it replaces the illuminator and sits on the existing irrigation base. It has several lighted kit options for 2-7w LED lights and would t break the bank!lights have 6 colors and two shows. The PT-6000 houses 2 60 W transformers and comes with a remote.
 Reply

 Posted: 2/20/2019 

It appears my niche will no longer accept screws/bolts from light somewhat corroded. The niche does not leak-recently checked. Is there an option to fix and tap new holes or is a new niche/light system the correct option? Light fixture very old I beleive it is a Hayward SP-540-z-1 needs replacement as well.
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InyoPools Product Specialist  Posted: 2/21/2019 

Hello - your best option would be the light wedge repair kit (132). The wedge and screw lock your light into place without having to alter the niche. Another option is the CMP Inground Pool Light Adapter, but this product requires that you drill into the niche.
 Reply

 Posted: 2/22/2019 

Thank you for the reply, Matt. What do you suggest for a pool fixture. To fit the niche or are they all the same size? Would like to go with an LED fixture that is economical and fits the Hayward SP-540-z-1 niche we have.
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InyoPools Product Specialist  Posted: 2/27/2019 

Your best will be the Pentair Intellibrite or the Pureline PureColors if you decide to go with the PureColors. These two models have similar performance and specs to one another, but the PureColors is significantly less expensive.
 Reply

 Posted: 2/18/2019 

I need to replace 2 Pentaur pool light bulbs. Each 300 watts with LED equivalent. The requirement I have is I don’t want colored pool water. Like to keep the same color that incandescent lites give off. Do I need to buy the commercial grade white bulbs? Do u have part number? Thank you
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InyoPools Product Specialist  Posted: 2/19/2019 

Hello TH - We'd recommend the 35W Pureline white LED bulb. The 120v bulb is part number PL5849 and the 12v bulb is part number PL5848. We'd also recommend replacing the lens gasket when replacing the bulb. The Pentair pool light lens gasket is part number 3525-07.
 Reply

 Posted: 9/5/2018 

Hello Hygie - What is the make and model of your pool light fixture?
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 Posted: 9/1/2018 

I have an old 500W incandescent pool wall light. I will only install an LED light if I can directly screw it in with no other changes. Have you got one like that?
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 Posted: 2/8/2018 

Is there a difference between r40 led for a pool light and the r40 led used in our homes?
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 Posted: 12/5/2017 

Ed - Here's the link to "How To Convert to a LED Color Changing Light by Changing the Light Bulb". And you are correct. Technology has changed since this was written. Give one of our Inyopools service reps a call at 407 834-2200 to discuss the compatibility of the newer and less expensive PureLine Pure Colors LED Pool Bulbs.
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 Posted: 11/28/2017 

Please provide a link to the "How To Convert to a LED Color Changing Light by Changing the Light Bulb” referenced in Step 9. It is exactly what I want to do. How long ago was this guide written? I would think demand for a color changing LED light and improvements in technology would have simplified this effort.
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InyoPools Product Specialist  Posted: 7/20/2017 

showme - If you need any more information, give us a call at 407-834-2200. Several more light options have come out since this guide was written.
 Reply

 Posted: 7/18/2017 

We are installing a light in our pool. The guy is coming to look at it today. We want to purchase the light online. I believe, this guide will help us do that. Thank you. A
 Reply