How To Troubleshoot a Pool Pump Motor - Motor Noisy

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If your pool pump motor start to get noisy, it often means that your motor's bearing are failing and need to be replaced. If a failing bearing is not replaced promptly, the motor can overheat and cause the windings to fail. This guide discusses possible causes of a noisy motor including bad bearings.

Click Here to View Pump Motor Parts (Including Run & Start Capacitors, Bearings, and Switches)


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Step by Step

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Step 1

BE SAFE - Before you even touch the motor, MAKE SURE THE POWER IS OFF. Always turn the power off at the electric service fuse or breaker box. To prevent electrical shock, use a meter to check for electrical shorts and be sure the motor is securely grounded and bonded in conformity with local codes. Do not work on electrical devices if water or moist conditions are present and cannot be avoided.

Step 2

CHECK LOOSE EXTERNAL PARTS - Check motor coupling, brackets and other attached parts. Tighten loose nuts, bolts or set screws. Sometimes it the motor is not bolted down properly, vibration over time will cause it to move around more and generate noise.

Click Here to View Pump Motor Parts (Including Run & Start Capacitors, Bearings, and Switches)

Click Here to Find Replacement Pump Parts (Motors, Impellers, Baskets & More) 


Step 3

CHECK LOOSE INTERNAL PARTS - Turn the motor shaft. If it is rough or tight, check inside for a loose or broken impeller or diffuser. They wear and start to wobble or sometime a hard object like a small stone or not will get inside and crack part of the impeller. Note: This picture is cut-away to be able to show the inside components of a pump.

Click Here to Find Replacement Pump Parts (Motors, Impellers, Baskets & More) 


Step 4

CHECK BEARINGS - If a tight shaft is not due to loose internal parts, check the motor's bearings. They may be starting to fail and will need to be replaced. Also be aware that bearing noise is often a sign that the pump seal has been leaking. Always change the pump seal when you change the bearings. Also always change both bearing if one is bad. The other is sure to follow.

Click Here to View Pump Motor Parts (Including Run & Start Capacitors, Bearings, and Switches)

Step 5

CHECK PUMP CAVITATION - If you see a lot of air in your pump's strainer basket, your pump is cavatating and this will generate noise. Cavitation is generally caused by an air leak in the suction side of the pump or by shutting down most of your intake valves so that you do not provide sufficient water to the pump.

Click Here to Find Replacement Pump Parts (Motors, Impellers, Baskets & More) 


Comments

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(1 to 24 of 24)

 Posted: 9/23/2020 

My bearings need to be replaced. I watched your video. I having a problem with the 4 long Screws. Do you have a part number for the screw. I sure I’ll have to drill a couple out. Thanks
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InyoPools Product Specialist  Posted: 9/23/2020 

 What is the part, model, or catalog number on your motor's label? A picture of the motor label would be most helpful.
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 Posted: 8/28/2020 

My pump bearings are going out. I have ordered the parts need to repair the problem, but is it safe to run the pump until the parts arrive? I don’t want stagnant water.
 Reply

InyoPools Product Specialist  Posted: 8/31/2020 

It will be fine to run your pump. It is just going to be very annoying for the time being. In the interim, consider buying your neighbors a set of earmuffs.
 Reply

 Posted: 8/9/2020 

My pump motor is leaking on the bottom, I'm gathering it's the pump seal? I was trying to make it to the end of summer to replace but now it's making a lot of noise. Does the protracted leak affect the bearings?
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InyoPools Product Specialist  Posted: 8/26/2020 

That loud noise coming from your pump is the sound of bearing failure. The leak you were seeing was creeping down the shaft of the motor into the motor case. Your bearings are in need of being replaced, and you will need at least the shaft seal
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 Posted: 7/4/2020 

I replace the bearing on Century 3 HP motor and it is still noisy. It runs fine otherwise. What else could it be?
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InyoPools Product Specialist  Posted: 8/26/2020 

Did you replace both bearings or just one of them? While you had the motor disassembled, did you notice rust or anything out of the ordinary on the other internal pieces?
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 Posted: 5/31/2020 

My pump is making a loud buzzing noise when it is on what could that be
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InyoPools Product Specialist  Posted: 10/23/2020  Latest

Buzzing/humming is a symptom of a failing capacitor.
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 Posted: 4/26/2020 

My motor is noisy, it is probably over 15 years old. Is it OK to shut the motor for a day or two till I get it replaced? Thanks
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InyoPools Product Specialist  Posted: 10/27/2020  Latest

Yes, it should be fine to shut down the pump for a day or two. Any longer than that could cause algae bloom to begin.
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 Posted: 4/25/2020 

Hayward pump SP2603 VSP with Century motor 1.65 hp M48AB21A04 motor sounds like it is grinding. Seals have been replaced no obstruction in impeller. If it’s the bearings what size do I need?
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InyoPools Product Specialist  Posted: 10/27/2020  Latest

Unfortunately, we do not list bearing numbers for that particular motor. In the last couple of years, I have yet to hear a homeowner successfully change the bearings on a variable speed motor. The VS are trickier to reassemble than the standard single speed.
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 Posted: 4/23/2020 

I recently installed a new pump motor about a week ago. After it sits overnight and turns on in the morning , It’s squeals for a minute and then goes away. What could this be?
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InyoPools Product Specialist  Posted: 4/24/2020 

It may be the beginning of a bearing issue. When you replaced the motor did you replace the shaft seal? After the pump runs for a while, does the equipment pad look wet? 
 Reply

 Posted: 4/1/2020 

I have an Astral Variable speed pump (viron P320) which is only 39 months old. It is noisey in a normal sound than it used to be, but is now screeching 2-3 times a day for 10-15 minutes at a time. Your thought? Repair or replace already?
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InyoPools Product Specialist  Posted: 4/2/2020 

Squealing or screeching is a sign of bad bearings. You may be able to replace bearings on that VS, but a motor shop will have to do the work. VS motors are more intricate than your standard single speed. Because your motor is more than three years old, the pump is likely no longer under warranty.
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 Posted: 12/9/2019 

What is the the pool pump is making a loud sucking type of noise? What could be the problem there? Cavitation? Thanks
 Reply

InyoPools Product Specialist  Posted: 12/10/2019 

It could be a suction side air leak. How to Identify and Correct Air Leaks
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InyoPools Product Specialist  Posted: 6/13/2017 

NoisyPool - If your motor is squealing badly, it is very likely that your motor bearings are going. You could try to replace the bearing, but when the motor gets to that point, most people just replace the motor.
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 Posted: 3/26/2019 

Hi Dennis, I think my bearings are going because the motor is making noise. You got my curiosity up your wrote that when your motor gets to the point that the bearings are going out, it's better to just replace the motor. Why is that? Why wouldn't replacing the bearings correct the issue? Thanks in advance for your response .
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InyoPools Product Specialist  Posted: 3/26/2019 

Hello Ron - The bearings can be replaced and you can add a few more months to the motor. We don't usually see people get years out of the motor after they replace the bearings. The windings are the next thing to fail and at that point, the motor will need to be replaced.
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 Posted: 6/12/2017 

After ensuring that the inlet and outlet are not obstructed, I would check the bearings on the motor and pump shafts. The bearings may require periodic lubrication. My next step would be to remove the pool pump motor, and check it for unusual noise. If everything is okay up to this point, I would think the pump has a problem. Depending on the pump, it might be repairable, or it might be designed in such a way that replacement is the only option.
- http://noisypool.com/

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